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Currents 116: Oliver Laric

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 27

Austrian-born artist Oliver Laric creates work that explores image creation and repetition, which he displays on both the museum and gallery circuit and the online realm. For his new exhibition, Currents 116: Oliver Laric, he presents his video animation Betweenness, which features repurposed mushrooms, people, anime characters and some snippets of the CT scan of the Saint Louis Art Museum's mummy, Amen-Nestawy-Nakht, all morphing into animals. The cycle of looped video blurs all of these borrowed images together, which reveals their shared shapes and forms. Laric also sculpted his own version of Reclining Pan (long on display in the museum's gallery 236) using 3D scans of the original. He used the digital files to "print" sections of the sculpture in various materials on a 3D printer, which he then assembled. Currents 116: Oliver Laric is on display in galleries 249 and 250 from February 22 to May 27 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

Printing Abstraction

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 31

Abstract art is a term that includes a wide variety of media: monochromatic color fields, hard-edged abstraction and its flat colors, and the sharply defined edges and optical illusions inherent in op-art's geometric forms. What links all of these styles together is that they are divorced from the traditional representation of physical objects. For its new exhibition Printing Abstraction, the Saint Louis Art Museum draws from its own holdings of abstract art created by printmakers. The show is something of an expansion of the museum's ongoing main exhibition, Graphic Revolution: American Prints 1960 to Now, in that it offers more examples of the printmakers' art and the key role it's played in the promulgation of abstract art. Printing Abstraction is on display from Tuesday through Sunday (November 30 to March 31) in galleries 234 and 235 of the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. free admission

Rachel Whiteread

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 9

Rachel Whiteread emerged on the London art scene in the "cool Britannia" era of the late '80s and early '90s. The country was doing well financially and culturally, and people were ready to buy contemporary art made by contemporary British artists. Whiteread established herself as a leading light with her casts of everyday objects, which solidified the negative space in, under and/or around them in materials such as wax, plaster, concrete and resin. House, Whiteread's massive, freestanding concrete cast of the interior of an entire three-story Victorian house, earned her the prestigious Turner Prize in 1993, making her the first woman to win. Rachel Whiteread, the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, is a retrospective of the artist's career that showcases 96 objects. They range from the small Untitled (Pink Torso), a voluptuous form of the inside of a hot water bottle cast in pink dental plaster, to the expansive Untitled (Twenty-Five Spaces), translucent resin casts of the underside of various chairs and stools arrayed on a game-board-like grid. The exhibit is on display Tuesday through Sunday (March 17 to June 9) at the Saint Louis Arts Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), and tickets are $6 to $12 (but free on Friday). $6-$12

How We See: Materiality and Color

Through June 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Humans can perceive a wide palette of colors, but we don't see as many hues as nature contains. The limitations of human vision are stretched in the Laumeier Sculpture Park's new exhibition How We See: Materiality and Color. Six artists who combine modern art practices with a keen observation of the natural world explore the possibilities of color manipulation and perception. Claire Ashley's specially commissioned, large-scale inflatable Ruddy Udder Dance is painted in neon colors. Volunteers will get inside it and perform a series of choreographed routines that allow you to see how its various shades change with movement and daylight. Ann Lindberg's graphite-and-colored-pencil piece as though air could turn to honey features a closely packed array of thin lines of pure pigment that become subtly darker toward the bottom. From a distance those tints blend and fade, and the piece appears to have a more uniform golden hue. How We See opens with a free reception at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 2, at Laumeier's Aronson Fine Arts Center (12580 Rott Road, Sunset Hill; www.laumeier.org). The exhibit continues through June 29, and admission is free. free admission

The Play That Goes Wrong

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through April 7

The Conley Polytechnic Drama Society, one of England's lesser-known community theater groups, has been bequeathed a large sum of money to produce a new play. The company decides on the 1920s murder-mystery The Murder at Haversack Manor mostly because it has parts enough for all the actors.

That's the fictitious background for The Play That Goes Wrong, which is actually a physically demanding comedy created by the Mischief Theatre Company, a very real performance troupe. As its title implies, the play within the play is a spectacular catastrophe before the curtain goes up. Props break, cues are missed and at least one actor is knocked unconscious, which starts a very public row about which cast member gets to play the part to the finale.

As you might imagine, making the play go wrong requires strenuous rehearsal and split-second timing from both the cast on stage and the cast back stage, the latter of whom are actors playing techs. Every role is demanding, because a mistake can result in very real injury — but when everybody hits their marks, you see a flawless, outrageously funny actor's nightmare unfold in real time. The Play that Goes Wrong closes out the Repertory Theatre St. Louis' current season. Performances take place Tuesday through Sunday (March 15 to April 7) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $19 to $92.

$19-$92

Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage

Through June 2

The Muny is just about to open its landmark 100th season, and its neighbor, the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBalivere Avenue; www.mohistory.org), celebrates the occasion with an exhibit dedicated to the history of America's largest outdoor theater. Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage features exhibits that explain the founding of the theater, display favorite memories from stars and staff, and give a look back stage to see how the dedicated technical crew creates and rigs all those sets and lights. You can also take a look at programs from the Muny's long, storied past. Muny Memories opens on Saturday, June 9, and remains on display daily through June 2, 2019. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage

Waitress

Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays-Fridays, 7:30 p.m., Sun., March 31, 1 & 6:30 p.m. and Sun., April 7, 1 p.m. Continues through April 7

Jenna has a gift for piemaking and a horrible marriage to the loutish Earl. Her friends at the diner all have their own problems, and so she does what she can — dream of a better life away from Earl and take solace in her baking. Things get worse when she discovers she's pregnant, but then improve slightly when she meets her dreamy OB/GYN, Dr. Pomatter. Jenna and the doctor have a lot in common, and before you know it they're embroiled in a steamy affair. But is an affair any way out of a marriage? Jenna pins her hopes on winning the grand prize in a baking contest and using the money to escape her small town and start over somewhere else, but life doesn't always give you what you want. The new fan-favorite musical Waitress is a feel-good story based on the Keri Russell film of the same name and features songs by Sara Bareilles. Waitress is performed Tuesday through Sunday (March 26 to April 7) at the Fox Theatre (527 North Grand Boulevard; www.fabulousfox.com). Tickets are $29 to $104. $29-$104

Buy Tickets
The Fox Theatre (map)
527 N. Grand Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-534-1111
Waitress

Brew in the Lou: Brewing History of St. Louis

Tue., March 26, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
phone 314-862-4959
www.stloasis.org

The history of brewing in St. Louis goes further back in history than the iconic Anheuser Busch. For 200 years, dozens of breweries have come and gone, including famous names such as Lemp and Falstaff. In this two-session class, we will learn about the history of the earliest and long forgotten breweries in St. Louis, their use of the caves lying underneath the city, and how the history of brewing beer has changed the face of the Gateway City. Date: 3/26/2019 – 4/2/2019 Sessions: Two (2) Time: 10 am to 12 Center of Clayton 50 Gay Ave, Clayton, MO 63105 $40

Center of Clayton (map)
50 Gay Ave.
Clayton
phone 314-290-8500

Aaron Griffin Band

Tue., March 26, 7-10 p.m.
phone 314-776-9550
[email protected]

St. Louis Blues Society presents Aaron Griffin Band Round out your night in the company of some of St. Louis' finest blues musicians and enjoy an evening of good vibes, selections from our food menu, a craft cocktail or artisanal wine, and the latest exhibit on our gallery walls. No Cover | Make your reservations at http://www.thedarkroomstl.com/reservations/ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm no cover

https://www.facebook.com/events/247374872877464/
The Dark Room (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-776-9550

Aaron Griffin Band

Tue., March 26, 7 p.m.

free

The Dark Room (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-776-9550

Naked Mike

Tue., March 26, 7 p.m.

free

Hammerstone's (map)
2028 S. 9th St.
St. Louis - Soulard
phone 314-773-5565

Trevor Hall

Tue., March 26, 7:15 p.m.

$20-$25

Delmar Hall (map)
6133 Delmar Blvd.
Delmar/ The Loop
phone 314-726-6161

Stephanie Schlaifer and Jennifer McCauley

Tue., March 26, 7:30-8:30 p.m.
,

Poetry at the Point on March 26 will feature poets Stephanie Schlaifer and Jennifer McCauley. Poetry at the Point is held at on the 4th Tuesday of the month. This reading series invites local and regional poets, and established and up-and-coming poets to share their words. The event is free. Free

Buy Tickets
The Focal Point (map)
2720 Sutton Blvd
Maplewood
phone 314-560-2778

Unturned

Tue., March 26, 7:30 p.m.

$12

Buy Tickets
Fubar (map)
3108 Locust St
St. Louis - Midtown
phone 314-289-9050

Dilly Dally

Tue., March 26, 8 p.m.

$18-$20

Off Broadway (map)
3509 Lemp Ave.
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-498-6989
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