Arts

32 total results

Currents 116: Oliver Laric

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 27

Austrian-born artist Oliver Laric creates work that explores image creation and repetition, which he displays on both the museum and gallery circuit and the online realm. For his new exhibition, Currents 116: Oliver Laric, he presents his video animation Betweenness, which features repurposed mushrooms, people, anime characters and some snippets of the CT scan of the Saint Louis Art Museum's mummy, Amen-Nestawy-Nakht, all morphing into animals. The cycle of looped video blurs all of these borrowed images together, which reveals their shared shapes and forms. Laric also sculpted his own version of Reclining Pan (long on display in the museum's gallery 236) using 3D scans of the original. He used the digital files to "print" sections of the sculpture in various materials on a 3D printer, which he then assembled. Currents 116: Oliver Laric is on display in galleries 249 and 250 from February 22 to May 27 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

Printing Abstraction

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 31

Abstract art is a term that includes a wide variety of media: monochromatic color fields, hard-edged abstraction and its flat colors, and the sharply defined edges and optical illusions inherent in op-art's geometric forms. What links all of these styles together is that they are divorced from the traditional representation of physical objects. For its new exhibition Printing Abstraction, the Saint Louis Art Museum draws from its own holdings of abstract art created by printmakers. The show is something of an expansion of the museum's ongoing main exhibition, Graphic Revolution: American Prints 1960 to Now, in that it offers more examples of the printmakers' art and the key role it's played in the promulgation of abstract art. Printing Abstraction is on display from Tuesday through Sunday (November 30 to March 31) in galleries 234 and 235 of the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. free admission

Rachel Whiteread

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 9

Rachel Whiteread emerged on the London art scene in the "cool Britannia" era of the late '80s and early '90s. The country was doing well financially and culturally, and people were ready to buy contemporary art made by contemporary British artists. Whiteread established herself as a leading light with her casts of everyday objects, which solidified the negative space in, under and/or around them in materials such as wax, plaster, concrete and resin. House, Whiteread's massive, freestanding concrete cast of the interior of an entire three-story Victorian house, earned her the prestigious Turner Prize in 1993, making her the first woman to win. Rachel Whiteread, the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, is a retrospective of the artist's career that showcases 96 objects. They range from the small Untitled (Pink Torso), a voluptuous form of the inside of a hot water bottle cast in pink dental plaster, to the expansive Untitled (Twenty-Five Spaces), translucent resin casts of the underside of various chairs and stools arrayed on a game-board-like grid. The exhibit is on display Tuesday through Sunday (March 17 to June 9) at the Saint Louis Arts Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), and tickets are $6 to $12 (but free on Friday). $6-$12

How We See: Materiality and Color

Through June 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Humans can perceive a wide palette of colors, but we don't see as many hues as nature contains. The limitations of human vision are stretched in the Laumeier Sculpture Park's new exhibition How We See: Materiality and Color. Six artists who combine modern art practices with a keen observation of the natural world explore the possibilities of color manipulation and perception. Claire Ashley's specially commissioned, large-scale inflatable Ruddy Udder Dance is painted in neon colors. Volunteers will get inside it and perform a series of choreographed routines that allow you to see how its various shades change with movement and daylight. Ann Lindberg's graphite-and-colored-pencil piece as though air could turn to honey features a closely packed array of thin lines of pure pigment that become subtly darker toward the bottom. From a distance those tints blend and fade, and the piece appears to have a more uniform golden hue. How We See opens with a free reception at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 2, at Laumeier's Aronson Fine Arts Center (12580 Rott Road, Sunset Hill; www.laumeier.org). The exhibit continues through June 29, and admission is free. free admission

A.Stigma.Tism by Victoria Donaldson

Tue., March 26, 4-8 p.m., Wed., March 27, 4-8 p.m., Thu., March 28, 4-8 p.m., Fri., March 29, 4-8 p.m., Sat., March 30, 4-8 p.m., Sun., March 31, 4-8 p.m., Mon., April 1, 4-8 p.m., Tue., April 2, 4-8 p.m., Wed., April 3, 4-8 p.m., Thu., April 4, 4-8 p.m., Fri., April 5, 4-8 p.m., Sat., April 6, 4-8 p.m., Sun., April 7, 4-8 p.m., Mon., April 8, 4-8 p.m., Tue., April 9, 4-8 p.m., Wed., April 10, 4-8 p.m., Thu., April 11, 4-8 p.m., Fri., April 12, 4-8 p.m., Sat., April 13, 4-8 p.m., Sun., April 14, 4-8 p.m., Mon., April 15, 4-8 p.m., Tue., April 16, 4-8 p.m., Wed., April 17, 4-8 p.m. and Thu., April 18, 4-8 p.m.
phone 314-776-9550
[email protected]
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A.Stigma.Tism' By Victoria Donaldson, currently on display through April 18. Victoria’s work encompasses all she encounters whether it be portraits of her colleagues in the music industry, the sacred moments with family, or the smiles of children during travel to Ghana. Her range of palette and eye for detail allow the viewer to be still and feel the importance of stillness. A expansive collection of both color and black and white photographs, Donaldson’s work allows the spectator a glimpse of all the artist holds sacred with great impact. Free Event

https://www.facebook.com/events/357230908225271/
The Dark Room (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-776-9550

Art in the Afternoon: Shawn Cornell

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through March 30
phone 314-645-4040
[email protected]
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Shawn Cornell Art Show Extended! Original Paintings, Pottery and Graphic Prints. Shawn Cornell is a plein air painter by the strictest terms. Simply defined – all paintings are completed 100% on location – there is absolutely no indoor touch up. He does this for the vast challenges of painting from firsthand outdoor observation and to fully honor the historical tradition of painting directly from life. Why complete the painting entirely on location? “It’s a personal challenge,” Shawn says, “I simply want to see if I can.” Show Runs Through March 30 free

http://nortonsfineart.com/events/
Norton's Fine Art & Framing (map)
2025 S. Big Bend Blvd.
Richmond Heights
phone 314-645-4040

Figurative Works II

Through April 5, 5:30-8 p.m.
phone 636-255-0270
[email protected]
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The Foundry Art Centre is excited to present "Figurative Works II", a multimedia international juried exhibition, to the community this February 22, 2019. Alex Folla, an Italian born and residing artist who exhibits his figurative paintings internationally, curated this exhibition. The show will include 49 artworks by 29 artists from thirteen states. Craftsmanship and personality shine through this collection of works depicting the human form. Two accompanying solo exhibitions will also be on view. "Island Beauty", by photographer Zuania Muñiz-Meléndez, and "Real Unreality" by painter Voytek will compliment the figurative theme of "Figurative Works II".

http://www.foundryartcentre.org/
Buy Tickets
Foundry Art Centre (map)
520 N. Main Center
St. Charles
phone 636-255-0270

Screen Print Essentials

Tuesdays, 6-9 p.m. Continues through March 26
phone 314-241-1346
[email protected]
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Screen Print Essentials Tuesdays, February 26 - March 26, 6:00-9:00pm Instructor: Stephen Wiggins Price: $255.00 In this introductory class students will learn how to coat their screens with emulsion, create an image ready to screen print, register the image and print it on paper and fabric to create their own limited edition 2 color screen print. $255.00

https://www.centralprint.org/screen-printing-essentials/
Buy Tickets
Central Print (map)
2624 N 14th St
St. Louis - North Downtown
phone 314-241-5030

Fredrick Nelson: Random Occurrences

Through April 13, 6 p.m.
phone 314-367-1076
[email protected]

Atrium Gallery announces an upcoming exhibition of new work by Fredrick Nelson. “Random Occurrences” is a very full, and dramatic body of work featuring paintings and also works on paper.

http://www.atriumgallery.net/future-exhibiton
Atrium Gallery (map)
4814 Washington Ave.
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-367-1076

The Abstract Expressionism of Ty de LaVenta

Through March 29, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
phone 314-229-7949
[email protected]

@ Y.E.H.S., 1924 S. 12th St. in Soulard
Exhibit features 11 new large size expressionism paintings by local St. Louis artist. Free

http://www.delaventastudio.com

Fashioning the Black Body

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 4

For black Americans, dressing well was not merely a matter of fashion — it was necessary for survival. In the era of sundown towns and the Green Book, when black families took the highways of America they dressed to the nines to show white America that they were people of substance, respectable and decent and not going to start any trouble. As they did with many of the rules enforced upon them, these early Americans took what little was allowed to them and made it their own source of pride. Hats were cocked at rakish angles, colors were vibrant and cuts were cleaner and sharper than what white America wore. In time, black styles were appropriated by the mainstream. Again and again the cycle has repeated itself, moving from black subcultures to the malls and schoolyards of middle America. The art show Fashioning the Black Body explores the ways in which fashion defines and projects the black identity in a variety of media. Mickalene Thomas' silkscreen I've Been Good to Me shows a black woman adorned and surrounded by color and pattern in her home. Mario Moore's oil painting One Day in the Land of Milk and Honey depicts a black figure laying flat on the ground, beneath it a subway platform upon which mills a group of faceless people in identical hoodies. Fashioning the Black Body opens with a free reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, March 15, at Projects+Gallery (4733 McPherson Avenue; www.projects-gallery.com). The show continues through May 4. free admission

Projects + Gallery (map)
4733 McPherson Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-696-8678
Fashioning the Black Body

Christine Corday: Relative Points

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through April 21

Space is deep, to quote Hawkwind, and yet scientists believe all living creatures on Earth contain stellar elements within their genetic makeup. Artist Christine Corday explores this union of humans and the stars in her new exhibition Relative Points, which was commissioned by the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis. Eleven of Corday's large sculptural forms, which are each made of more than 10,000 pounds of elemental metals and metalloid grit, will be arranged within the museum in a pattern of Corday's choosing. The sculptures, which resemble slightly squashed black marshmallows more than four feet high, are intended to be touched; they're essentially the same base elements as humans, after all. During the course of the exhibit, the shapes will change gradually from repeated contact and the inexorable force of universal gravitational attraction. You'll have your first opportunity to get close and personal with Corday's work at the opening reception, which takes place from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, January 18, at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). Christine Corday: Relative Points remains fixed in space through April 21. free admission

Freedom in a Platform

Fridays, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through April 13

The Luminary (2701 Cherokee Street; www.theluminaryarts.com) reopens after its winter break with a new group show that explores both the reconfigured gallery space and the idea of an exhibition itself. Freedom in a Platform is inspired by the Diggers, a seventeenth-century movement that advocated for economic equality by farming on common land rather than privately owned acreage. The artists showing work in Freedom in a Platform will repurpose the gallery and how it's used, with performances, a rotating end date that sees pieces move throughout the gallery, and pieces that will disappear from the exhibition and perhaps later return. Sage Dawson, Ohad Meromi, Marina Peng and OOIEE all have work in the show, which opens with a free reception from 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, March 8. free admission

The Luminary (map)
2701 Cherokee St
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-773-1533
Freedom in a Platform

Fabric of Spring I

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 26
phone 314-402-1959
[email protected]

Green Door art gallery is proud to present “Fabric of Spring”. The Opening Reception will be Friday, March 22, from 5-8 pm and is free and open to the public. Featuring Gena Loseto with sensitive drawing and yupo watercolors, Alicia Farris’ watercolors, the sewn fabric paintings of Mary Beth Gray, Sandra Illian’s textural weavings and Michael Plurd’s modern calendar pin-ups. These painting will be available from March 6, 2019 thru April 26, 2019. Free

http://GreenDoorartgallery.com/events
Green Door Art Gallery (map)
21 N. Gore Ave.
Webster Groves
phone 314-402-1959

Another Vision: Featuring Works From The Women Of The Hall Of Fame

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 6
phone 314-535-1999
[email protected]
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Another Vision presents the works of women in the Hall of Fame, revisiting the centrality of women’s contributions to the development of the art and science of photography. Elizabeth Eikmann, Curator. Women photographers have consistently pushed boundaries, taken risks, and preserved against the odds- all to show the world a new perspective and capture another vision. The exhibition features exceptional works spanning the history of the photographic medium from Hall of Fame Inductees Ruth Bernhard, Margaret Bourke-White, Julia Margaret Cameron, Anne Geddes, Dorothea Lange, and Annie Leibovitz. Members: Free Non Members: $10 Seniors/Students: $5

http://iphf.org/exhibitions/another-vision/
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