Arts

40 total results

A Century of Japanese Prints

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 28

Japan had a long history of woodblock printing (ukiyo-e) that, although now recognized for their artistic qualities, were at the time purely commercial works. That began to change in the mid-nineteenth century, as Japanese artists were exposed to Western printmaking. These early modern artists began the creative print movement, which was motivated by a desire to explore the artistic possibilities of Japan's traditional hand-carved woodblock printing methods. Artists such as Kobayakawa Kiyoshi and Hashiguchi Goyō created portraits of modern Japanese society in prints that are both beautiful works of art and incredible documents of an era. The Saint Louis Art Museum displays a treasure trove of them in the new exhibit, A Century of Japanese Prints. The show opens on Friday, August 11, and remains up through January 28. Admission is free. free admission

Currents 114: Matt Saunders

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 4

American artist Matt Saunders is interested in the way an image can be altered with the passage of time. He pursues that interest through photography and animation, with a particular emphasis on avoiding cameras. Instead he captures light that has passed through oil paintings on linen, or through printed-on plastic, to create the shadows of images; his photograms are almost dark reflections of the intervening material. Saunders has created all-new work for Currents 114: Matt Saunders, his new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Among these new works are large-scale copper-plate etchings and a video installation that plays across multiple screens in two galleries. The mutable images of Matt Saunders are on display Tuesday through Sunday (November 17 to February 4) in gallery 249 and 250. Admission is free. free admission

Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 3

As strange as it seems to us in the West, Japanese artists in the nineteenth century did not view their own drawings as individual works of art. They were "thinking on paper" or creating visual aids for wood carvers and printers who would create the actual work of art: the woodblock print. But despite their creators' misgivings about the artistry, drawings by master woodblock printers such as Utagawa Kuniyoshi and Katsushika Hokusai are indeed works of art. Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century, the new exhibition at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org), collects more than 80 such "throwaway" drawings that capture the artists' work in their own hands, with corrections and alterations that demonstrate how they thought about and edited their projects "in camera." Living Proof is on display November 3 through March 3. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century

Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere

Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Feb. 3

Photographer Steve McCurry created an iconic image with his portrait of a young Afghani girl and her haunting, bottomless eyes, which stared down his lens and seemingly into the innermost chamber of your heart. But that photograph isn't the extent of McCurry's work. For almost 40 years he has been traveling the world, photographing people in India, the temples of Angkor Wat, burning oil fields in Kuwait, and indeed, even an entire series on the striking eyes he spots in people's faces the world over. Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere, the new exhibition of his work at the Sheldon (3648 Washington Boulevard; www.thesheldon.org), features 37 photographs made by McCurry during his journey. The exhibit opens with a free reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, October 6. The show continues through February 3, 2018, and the gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere

Yvonne Osei: Tailored Landscapes

Mondays-Wednesdays, Fridays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Thursdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through March 4

Yvonne Osei takes over the Adam Aronson Fine Arts Center for her exhibition Tailored Landscapes — literally. Her large-scale photo installation occupies the length and breadth of the gallery, the two-year-old indoor gallery located at Laumeier Sculpture Park. The German-born artist has been photographing Laumeier throughout the past year; these images are then manipulated to create patterns reminiscent of the brightly patterned textiles of her Ghanian culture. Osei's manufactured figures comprise people observing the park’s sculptures, roads and the backdrop of greenery that surrounds Laumeier, but these elements only become apparent at close range. free admission

Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 21

We live in a high-tech world in which we can communicate instantly with someone on the other side of the globe — or even orbiting in space on the International Space Station — without really understanding how such technological marvels occur. We may as well be victims of Arthur C. Clarke's Third Law: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." German artist Thomas Struth reveals how scientists and engineers perform their magic tricks simply by showing you where the magic happens. His monumental photographs reveal the research spaces and installations where science reshapes our world every day. Thirty-five of Struth's visually dense photographs make up the new exhibition Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics at Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The show features robotics laboratories and aeronautical centers that appear to be sets from a big-budget sci-fi movie, but they're really just office spaces for some of the most intelligent people on earth. Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics will be on display November 5 through January 21. Admission is $6 to $12. $6-$12, free on Friday

Gateway Pastel Association Exhibit

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 25
phone 314-402-1959
[email protected]

Gateway Pastel Artists was founded in 1998 in St. Louis, Missouri will have it’s exhibiton/sale from January 17, 2018 thru February 25, 2018 along with Mary Engelbreit Originals The Recep-tion will be Friday, January 19, from 5-8 pm and is free and open to the public. Green Door art gallery, 21 N. Gore in Old Webster Groves. Hours Wednesday thru Sunday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm- Closed Monday and Tuesday www. Greendoorartgallery.com (314) 402-1959

http://www.greendoorartgallery.com
Green Door Art Gallery (map)
21 N. Gore Ave.
Webster Groves
phone 314-402-1959
Gateway Pastel Association Exhibit

Carl Safe: The Architecture of Buildings, Furniture and Photographs

Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 17
phone 314-533-9900
,

The career of Carl Safe, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Architecture, Sam Fox School of Design and Art at Washington University in St. Louis, is celebrated in this exhibit of furniture, architectural designs and photographs. Safe has been a member of the faculty there since 1970, where he has taught design studios and support courses. In addition to his status as Professor Emeritus, Safe is Principal at Carl Safe Design Consultants. Free

http://thesheldon.org/upcoming-exhibits.php
Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900

Invent a Musical Instrument: Selections From The Sheldon's Hartenberger World Music Collection

Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through Jan. 27
phone 314-533-9900
,

This exhibit features a selection of inventive musical instruments by students from area schools made during The Sheldon’s SOLID (Science of Learning Instrument Design) program in 2016 and 2017. A collaboration between The Sheldon, the St. Louis Science Center, St. Louis Public Schools, St. Louis Archdiocesan Schools, Grand Center Arts Academy and Boeing scientists, the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) program, funded by Boeing, takes students through a design and build process using found objects and recyclables. Free

http://thesheldon.org/upcoming-exhibits.php
Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900

Jill Evans Petzall: Still Lives with Stories

Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Continues through Jan. 20
phone 314-533-9900
,

Emmy award-winning filmmaker and media-artist Jill Evans Petzall’s innovative exhibit explores how Western biases are promoted across cultures through stereotypes in travel photography. Her photographs shot in Southeast Asia of strangely static human bodies become metaphorical “still lives.” Visitors can record their own stories with the artist on selected days. A selection of the recordings will become a lasting part of the artwork. This interactive exhibit asks us to discover what our snapshots reveal beyond ourselves and our “selfies.” Free

http://thesheldon.org/upcoming-exhibits.php
Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900

Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere

Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 3
phone 314-533-9900
,

Documentary photographer and storyteller Steve McCurry has been one of the most iconic voices in contemporary photography for almost 40 years. His work spans conflicts, ancient traditions and contemporary culture from six continents - yet always retains the human element that made his celebrated image of a young Afghan girl, published on the cover of National Geographic Magazine, so powerful. Free

http://thesheldon.org/upcoming-exhibits.php
Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900

The World of Spectacular Strings

Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through April 28
phone 314-533-9900
,

Drawn from The Sheldon’s Hartenberger World Music Collection, this exhibit features over 100 unique stringed instruments from around the world including Europe, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, the Middle East and Asia. Instruments from the United States include a rare double bass and violin made from matchsticks, a harpsichord owned by former St. Louis resident comedienne Phyllis Diller, a Gibson guitar signed by B.B. King, and a special edition KISS logo Gene Simmons “Axe” bass. Free

http://thesheldon.org/upcoming-exhibits.php
Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900

Carol Boss' Art

Mondays-Sundays, 6:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through Jan. 30
phone 314-241-1464
[email protected]

Carol Boss will have some paintings and photographs hanging at Soulard Coffee Garden starting 12/23-1/30 with a reception on 1/21 from 2-4pm. Should be good. Combining a couple of my favorite things, coffee and art. Please note: Soulard Coffee Garden will be closed 12/24-12/25. For more info on Carol carolbossart.com/ free

https://www.facebook.com/events/1985503161673571/

Identi-TEA

Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through March 18

The humble teapot is a staple for ceramicists. They're functional and make good gifts (mothers love them), as well as allowing the artist to stretch creatively. A handle, a lid and a spout are the essential elements, but beyond that, anything goes. Identi-TEA: The Sixteenth Biennial Teapot exhibition at the Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design (6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.craftalliance.org) features a wild and whimsical selection of teapots. The opening reception takes place from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, January 12, and the show continues through March 18. The gallery is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free. free admission

Mane 'n Tail

Starts Jan. 19. Fri., Jan. 19, 7-10 p.m., Thursdays, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. and Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through March 8

For young black women, beauty supply shops provide their first real creative outlet. Keeping up with the latest trends allows them to learn how to protect and care, use makeup and get pointers from older women. It's a communal experience that the rest of us seldom, if ever, experience. In her art, Katherine Simóne Reynolds explores how commerce and her community meet in these shops every Friday night. Her new exhibition, Mane 'n Tail</b>, shows her work and also has artists LaKela Brown, Narcissister and Rachel Youn interpreting this idea. Mane 'n Tail opens with a free reception from 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, January 19, at the the Luminary (2701 Cherokee Street; www.theluminaryarts.com) and continues through March 8. free admission

The Luminary (map)
2701 Cherokee St
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-773-1533
Mane 'n Tail
Showing 1-15 of 40 total results in this search.
Top